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20121112
20121112
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
an unusual pentagon briefing that the timeline of events in libya as we now know them may be a far cry from what actually went on in benghazi. we're going to talk with pete leg seth about this new version of events is so troubling troubd where this story goes from here as it continues to unfold. >>> there are a growing number of reports out this week suggesting gun and ammunition sales are soaring in recent weeks, driven in part by a concern about a second term for president obama and that it could mean new restrictions on the rights of gun owners. trace gallagher is looking looko this phenomenon. hello, trace. >> reporter: hey, shannon. the most reliable way to track gun sales is by looking at the number of background checks being conducted. when president obama took office, the number of background checks went up by 1.5 million, they have steadily gone up since then. 2009, 11.4 million background checks, 11.5 in 2010. then look at the jump, 13 million background checks in 2011, and so far this year 14.8 million background checks and a lot of gun owners say in the past four or fife days --
for the military. >> reporter: the dreaded sequestration would double the $500 billion in cuts the pentagon is already planning to make over the next decade. defense secretary panetta has not minced words. >> if sequestration goes into effect it's a disaster for national defense. >> reporter: the strategy of pivoting away from the wars in iraq and afghanistan towards the pacific and an emerging chinese superpower would come undone. >> all of that can go to hell if this congress doesn't face up and deal with the issue of sequestration. >> reporter: in this letter to senators panetta warned by the time sequestration was over the u.s. would have the smallest ground force since 1940, smallest navy since 1915 and smallest air force ever. a bleak prediction which ignores the quantum leap in weapons technology. as the president pointed out in the debate no other country comes close. >> we spend more on our military than the next ten countries combined. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that. according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment it's not the size of the cuts, abo
at the pentagon for us. good morning. tell us, what is the status of the investigation right now? >> well, good morning, alina. "the new york times" is now reporting this morning that the investigation actually began some months ago. but, again, the questions continue to mount. it wasn't until election night that the director of national intelligence, james clapper, was informed that this was all going on. the white house informed the next day,and the president the day after that. so how you have an fbi investigation, which whatever went on did involve looking into the matters of general david petraeus, your cia director, and the president isn't informed. this is one of the key questions congress, the congressional committee's concerned, they weren't informed. so expect to see a lot more about this for the next many days. >> barbara, let's talk a little bit more about that. as you mentioned the white house wasn't notified until 5:00 p.m. on election night. the president wasn't told until the thursday after election day. house and senate intelligence committees weren't told until last week. i kn
in spending over the next ten years for the pentagon? what's a reasonable part of the deal for na? >> i think a reasonable one is actually about the amount in the sequestration. that's a little bit less than what the boles-simpson commission had. they had about $750 billion. if you take a salmi slice cut like the sequestration bill does, you will harm the military. if you're able to say, wait a moment, maybe we don't need quite as many submarines and we need a sensor system and you can change how we are to the systems we're procuring, then you're able to do this decrease in spending if you put it in the right capability. that's the enormous change that we have to have in our military. look, the navy dpom natuominate commons of the seas and the air force dominates the commons of the air. we have to dominate the commons of cyberspace. look what we did to iran. when we take down centrifuges that enrich the terrain yum. by one virus we stymied them for a while. imagine if we read everything out there and the other side knows that we can do that kind of damage. that is what is very difficult to br
pentagon correspondent, in which she stocked to petraeus' spokesman while he was in iraq and the question was how is holly doing and the answer was furious would be an understatement. >>> joining us, our senior political analyst, david gergen. he's known both general petraeus and paula broadwell for several year, has communicated with both of them electronically since the scandal broke. also joining us, howard kurtz, the host of "reliable sources" also the washington bureau chief for "newsweek" and "the daily beast." first of all, david gergen, let me go to you. you've communicated with general petraeus, with paula broadwell. what are they saying? how are they doing? what do they have to relate? >> well, the communication had been private, wolf, and i had sent them notes of support when this news first broke because i have known both of them for a long time. i know him better than i know paula, but i just think the world of him. he's been one of the finest leaders of his generation, warrior scholar, has done great service for this country. i was just -- this is so painful for him and for
revealed. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more on this, including a fox news exclusive. >> or well, we've been looking at a speech that paula broadwell gave on october 26th in denver, colorado, and in that speech she raises some serious questions that some are wondering whether she may have revealed details that she knew about the benghazi investigations, details that broadwell may have, in fact, obtained from her relationship with cia director david petraeus. at this speech at her alma mater in denver on october 26th, the same day as fox news reported by the way that requests from the ci ark annex were -- cia annex were denied, she said this: >> the cia annex had actually, had taken a couple of libyan militia members prisoners, and they think that the attack on the consulate was an effort to try to get the prisoners back, so that's still being vetted. >> reporter: being vetted by whom, the cia? that wasn't in any of the official cia timelines. the implication is that the attack on the u.s. consulate was, n. a strike against the cia opera
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)